Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Mama Renee's Living Legacy

By Oliver Oliveros, Editor-In-Chief

Ollie David, who was the overall chair of Philippine fashion icon Renee Salud’s recent smash hit fashion shows held at Double Tree Newark Hotel in New Jersey and at the Philippine Center, the building that houses the Philippine Consulate General in New York, pinned down in her opening remarks that Mama Renee, a moniker for the well-loved fashion designer, who rose to fame in the ‘80s, has been “at the forefront of creating intricate masterpieces that weave native piña (pineapple fiber), abaca, and the Maguindanaon’s inaul, among others, even way before other Filipino and non-Filipino fashion designers started to claim that same exact design process.”

“Mama Renee’s original intent and his still ever-burning passion to promote only the Philippines’ indigenous fabrics in his fashion pieces makes him even more relevant till this very day,” Ollie added.

For Mama Renee, he did it—and still doing it—to show his enduring love for the Philippines and the Filipino people. He also believes our native fabrics and meticulous beadwork and embroidery should be seen all over the world.

So it’s not at all (or hardly) surprising to meet a brood of young fashion designers today who have been following the footsteps of Mama Renee. One of these promising young designers is San Francisco-based Anthony Cruz Legarda, whom I had the pleasure of meeting with at San Lorenzo Ruiz Chapel in Manhattan a few years ago. Legarda incorporates authentic hand-woven fabrics especially that of the piña, into unique American wear. In fact, Mama Renee and Legarda, alongside fellow Filipino fashion designers Patis Tesoro and Dita Sandico Ong, not too long ago collaborated on a fashion-trade show called “Fibre Filippine,” which features high-fashion pieces made from local fabrics abaca, banana, salago, maguey, buri and, of course, piña, held in Rome.

In the same league as Mama Renee and Legarda is Betina Ocampo, one of this year’s recipients of The Outstanding Filipino-Americans In New York (TOFA-NY) awards. Also inspired by the complex handmade fashion pieces of tribal communities in the Philippines, Ocampo launched a luxury t-shirt line, Betina, in 2012, while finishing her studies at Parsons School of Design in Manhattan. To her credit, her designs have been featured in premier fashion magazines such as Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, and Cosmopolitan.

And the list goes on.

Bottom line is that what Mama Renee, together with a few fashion designers, started several decades ago has continued to grow in the safe hands of our new generation of Filipino couturiers.

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Friday, August 07, 2015

Know Your Rights as a Landlord


First Published on PropertyAsia.ph 

If you’re a landlord, there’s this high probability of encountering problems with your tenants every once in a while. Fundamentally, to solve any problem between you and your tenants, you have to know your basic rights, including the dos and the don’ts, as a landlord.

To help you further, we’ve listed some of these rights you have in your hands as a lessor:

Choosing a Tenant 

As a landlord, one of your major rights is to choose your tenants. You can do that by asking for income and credit information, rental history, and guarantees. You may also want to be picky about accepting tenants, but you can’t refuse a tenant based on one’s race, place of origin, gender, sexual orientation, age, marital status, religion, and disability.

If you want to make sure you’re choosing the right tenants, work hard on the inspection process and take time to know them personally before you accept them.

Collecting Deposit and Rent 

Before your tenants move in to your property, you have the right to collect a rent deposit. When you both sign the lease tenancy agreement, you may collect the rent deposit in full. The agreement should state the amount of the rent deposit and when it is due.

As for increasing the rent, you have the right to do so but only once in a 12-month period and depending on your lease tenancy agreement. If you’re to raise the rent, make sure the new amount is justifiable and can be compared to similar properties in your neighborhood. 

Entering the Premises 

Landlords can only enter the property in case of emergency and for the purposes of inspecting the premises, cleaning, and making repairs and improvements. You can also enter the premises to show the property to prospective buyer or tenant. However, you’re not allowed to enter the premises impromptu. If you would like to inspect the property, you should give prior notice to the tenants.

In case of a tenant’s extended absence, which is seven days or more, you can enter the property to inspect for damages that may need repairs.

Maintaining the Property 

Maintaining the property can be more like a responsibility than a right. However, it’s not just you who’s responsible for the maintenance but also your tenants. They should also take care of your property during their stay, and you have the right to charge them for any damages. If the tenants refuse to pay for the cost of the repair, you can make a deduction from the tenants’ damage deposit. 

However, you can’t charge your tenants right away. You should be able to show a proof that the damage was caused while your property was occupied by them. Therefore, it’s wise to take detailed photos of the entire property before your tenants move in, so any “future damages” can be spotted quickly.

By the way, you can’t charge the repair of normal wear and tear of furnishings, e.g. carpets and furniture, to your tenants.

Evicting Tenants 

If your tenants didn’t pay for a long period and no solution was offered, you have the right to evict them. Make sure to give them notice first. You can’t harass your tenants in any way so inform them in the most proper way.

If they remain in your property at the end of the notice, you can apply for a possession order; if they don’t comply, you can then apply for an eviction warrant—in such a situation, only the police can evict tenants under court order.

For more practical tips, visit PropertyAsia.ph
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